Tag: communication

Public Engagement and Science Communication at NC State

Monday, June 9th, 2014 | Tags: ,

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Nicolas Canete, an international student from Paraguay who recently earned his master’s degree in communication at NC State. Most NC State researchers are involved in some form of public engagement when it comes to science communication, but that public engagement takes a variety of forms. I know

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Media Coverage Drives Some Misperceptions about Cancer

Monday, January 27th, 2014 | Tags: ,

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Ryan Hurley, a health communication researcher and assistant professor of communication at NC State, on two papers related to news media, cancer, and public perception. People need and want recent information about cancer in order to make decisions about how they might manage their personal prevention, detection,

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How Changing the Way We Study Gold Could Boost Communication Tech

Monday, December 2nd, 2013 | Tags: , ,

Under the right circumstances, pushing on nothing is harder than pushing on something – at least when that “something” is gold. That’s the finding from a new materials science paper, and it’s a finding that could expedite the development of new wireless communication technologies. The Problem At issue are ohmic radio frequency microelectricalmechanical systems switches

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Researchers Work to Squeeze More Data from Bandwidth in Mobile Devices

Monday, September 30th, 2013 | Tags: , ,

A team of researchers is working on technology that would allow mobile devices to send and receive more data using the same limited amount of bandwidth. The work is supported by a $1.08 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF). Competition for the airwaves is fierce. Commercial and military communication services must broadcast and

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Trust and Towns in Transition

Monday, August 12th, 2013 | Tags: , , ,

Near the Blue Ridge Parkway, three North Carolina towns have grown rapidly as jobs shifted from mining and timber to hospitality and tourism. In Macon County, natural resource-based jobs plummeted from 10 percent to almost zero in the last 35 years. Meanwhile, service-industry employment in the Franklin area topped 30 percent. It’s the kind of

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